FAQ About NSA’s Interest in Angry Birds and Other ‘Leaky Apps’

http://feeds.propublica.org/~r/propublica/main/~3/W0d9IaFe46E/

by Julia Angwin
and Jeff Larson
As we detailed on Monday, documents show the NSA and its
British counterpart have been probing advertiser data on smartphone apps,
which can include your gender, income, and even whether you’re a “swinger.”
Do you have questions? Post them in comments or tweet us.
What’s new here?
This article reveals how U.S. and British spy agencies have
sought to intercept the information transmitted by the games and other apps
that users download onto their smartphones. Previous stories have detailed how
U.S. and British spies have been intercepting massive quantities of
cellphone text messages and gathering the location of cellphones around the world.
How does it work?
Many people don’t realize that when they use a smartphone
app – to play a game or listen to music – the app may transmit
information back to the app maker and may contain tracking technology placed by
advertisers.
The spy agencies call these “leaky apps.” The spies collect
information from among others, Google Maps, Twitter,
LinkedIn, Facebook, Yahoo’s Flickr, which in turn can transmit location, buddy
lists, browsing history and more, according to a 2010 NSA document.
A 2010 Wall Street Journal survey
of 101 iPhone and Android apps showed that the majority of apps were
transmitting the phone’s unique ID – a type of serial number assigned to
the device – and the user’s location to advertisers.
Since then, advertisers have been building even more detailed
profiles of app users.
By using the phone’s identifier, advertisers can often
monitor the user’s behavior in multiple apps and when the user browses the Web
from their smartphone. Advertisers can tie the information together in a dossier
that can include a user’s location, income and preferences such as sexual
orientation and political leanings.
How does the NSA get it?
The agencies can pick up much of this information as it
travels through private cellphone networks around the world. And because the
data includes a tag from your phone, the agencies may have the ability to know
who you are.
Does this mean the
NSA is watching me while I play Angry Birds?
It’s not clear. The documents show that spies have collected
data from Google’s AdMob, which is largest mobile advertising network and is
one of many advertisers whose ads have appeared in Angry Birds.
The agencies say that even if they collect the data, they
don’t look at it unless it is relevant to an investigation.
The NSA also says that it “minimizes”– or throws away – the data
it intercepts from people who live in the United States. However, its
minimization rules allow it to keep information about U.S. residents if it is
deemed suspicious or could be relevant to an investigation.
Do they really know
if I’m a “swinger”?
Documents show that analysts at GCHQ in 2012 studied the
possibility of collecting traffic from Millennial Media, which included
advertising profiles that identified users by ‘sexual orientation’ including
the category of swingers.
However, it is unclear whether the data has been used for
intelligence purposes.
It is also not clear what type of app usage or Web browsing
behavior would lead Millennial Media to characterize someone as a swinger. Millennial
declined our request for comment.
Can I stop leaky apps
from sending out data about me?
No, but you can make it harder for advertisers
to track you on your phone.
Apple’s latest iPhone software, iOS 7, offers two options to
limit ad tracking.
In privacy settings, users can turn on “limit ad
tracking,” which prevents apps from using the phone’s unique ID – which Apple
calls an “Advertising Identifier” – to deliver targeted ads within apps.
But this setting does not prevent apps from collecting your information.
In privacy settings, users can also reset their
Advertising Identifier, which can make it more difficult but not impossible for
advertisers to correlate the user’s behavior to the advertising profile
associated with the old identifier.

Google’s Android also offers users two options to limit ad
tracking.
In the Ads section of the Google Settings app,
users can check a box to “Opt out of interest-based ads.” But this does not
prevent apps from collecting user’s information.

In the Ads section of the Google Settings app,
users can also reset the Google advertising identifier, http://developer.android.com/google/play-services/id.html,
which can make it more difficult – but not impossible – for
advertisers to correlate the user’s behavior to the advertising profile
associated with the old identifier.

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